Written by on May 20, 2014 - No comments

There have been these extra 5 keys on my key ring for many moons… how long? I wish I could tell you. But in the car I’m now driving these keys dangle and annoy the heck out of my thigh when the car key is in the ignition.  So they became a new focus for me lately. I finally asked myself… Do I need this extra baggage? Do I need these keys, and are they an important part of my life? No, I don’t. I honestly don’t remember what 4 of these 5 keys even open. So today, I’m cleaning out my mind and load with 5 less keys. It’s not a big deal, but there is a lesson in this metaphor…

The popular social media author and publisher, Seth Godin, wrote recently about the issue of clutter in the mind, and how important it is that we recognize that we can’t do more than one thing at a time. The whole notion of “multi-tasking” is actually a popular myth. Yes, we can walk and chew gum. Yes we can play the guitar and sing at the same time, but only with things that we have committed to memory, or are part of our auto-pilot routine. Tackling important tasks require much focus and attention, and need all of our energy–energy that is in short supply.  Plus, we are all under the gun to accomplish more in less time.

Rid yourself of clutter and things that don’t serve you.  As has been said before: Cut off that which does not serve you and cast it into the fire. Clutter is more debilitating that you realize, and I bet there are many routines, relationships, and perceived values riddled in your schedules that are not serving you, and instead distracting you from greater things. They are thieves; make no mistake. There is a great cost to leaving them in your world. So what can you de-clutter so that you can focus better?

About the Author

Eric Murr, General Sales Manager | emurr@kegerreis.com | Follow me: @ThePoetMuse Manager. Trainer. Presenter, Eric has spent 20 years in sales and personnel development, leading various companies to higher profits and dramatic increases in revenue.  From top 10 Media markets to smaller business owners, Eric brings to the table knowledge of thousands of media programs, small and large.

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Written by on April 23, 2014 - No comments

This month’s post is actually going to encourage you to read a different blog.  The author is Seth Godin, and if you are any student of capitalism or have any desire to improve your business and culture, then we strongly suggest you subscribe!  This man cranks out more great advice in a week than most authors crank out in a year.    Click here for Seth’s latest, “They’re your words, choose them,”…   It’s another good one!

About the Author

Eric Murr, General Sales Manager | emurr@kegerreis.com | Follow me: @ThePoetMuse Manager. Trainer. Presenter, Eric has spent 20 years in sales and personnel development, leading various companies to higher profits and dramatic increases in revenue.  From top 10 Media markets to smaller business owners, Eric brings to the table knowledge of thousands of media programs, small and large.

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Written by on March 26, 2014 - No comments

My father is an avid history book reader.  I used to love digging through his war books and reading the accounts of hundreds of historic military maneuvers.  The strategy employed determined the triumph or defeat of nearly every battle we read about today.  When it comes to advertising, applying tactics to the battle of persuasion can determine the success or failure of your message.

Moving a client from awareness to the point of purchase requires a clear and definite strategy.  For some industries, only a brief engagement is required.  Take, for example, food.  Hunger is an immediate need, and a billboard shouting an attractive price point or the promise of food only minutes away is an easy message.  Tactic: Feature driven ad, promising good food at a good price.

Conversely, when dealing with a larger item that requires deeper commitment, a different strategy must be employed.  Take, for example, a pool company.  Purchasing a pool is a major decision; it’s a bigger price point, bigger commitment, bigger upkeep.   A long term strategy appealing to the emotions of the buyer is in the best interest of the advertiser (the price, at this point, can be a prohibitive message).  A smart advertiser knows that “digging in” over time, keeping their name out there, builds recognition.  Recognition builds trust, and when the client is ready to surrender, the strategy has paid off.  Tactic: Longer advertising rotation, emotionally appealing message. 

How about you?  Are you intelligently engaging potential customers?  I don’t need to tell you what poor planning does; history has a long tally of losses that don’t need repeated.  Developing tactical strategy might not be easy, and it will take time…but seeing your effort translate to a win makes it all worth it.

About the Author

Christy Schale, Creative Director | christy@kegerreis.com I’ve been involved in the creative process in one way or another since I was a child, singing and dancing my heart out on stage at my church. It’s not just what I do, it’s my life.

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